Avaya looks to the UK with deal

US-based Avaya has made a British purchase as it looks to build on its speech analytics services.


US-based Avaya has made a British purchase as it looks to build on its speech analytics services.

US-based Avaya has made a British purchase as it looks to build on its speech analytics services.

Worcestershire-based Aurix is being acquired for an undisclosed amount and will now become a wholly owned subsidiary of Avaya.

Avaya provides business communications and collaboration systems to businesses globally.

Brett Shockley, senior vice president for corporate development, strategy and innovation at Avaya, says that the value of document search engines is now ‘widely understood’.

He adds: ‘There’s another dimension of data that is largely untapped, however, and that is the information exchanged through spoken interactions.

‘Aurix’s technology will enable Avaya’s customers to quickly find the interactions that can impact their ability to attain higher customer satisfaction and increase revenue generation.’

According to a statement Aurix’s technology allows for real-time identification, search and data mining of large volumes of audio and audio-visual material.

Chief executive officer at Aurix, Peter Rogers, comments: ‘a Voice interaction represents a vast resource of untapped knowledge. Aurix has focused on building easy-to-use solutions to extract this intelligence to create competitive advantage.

‘The combination of Avaya Aura and Aurix’s speech analytics services offer a number of opportunities to create business and customer value that we look forward to accelerating through this acquisition.’

The purchase of Aurix is the second October acquisition for Avaya following a deal for communications business Sipera.

Todd Cardy

Adelbert Swaniawski

Todd was Editor of GrowthBusiness.co.uk between 2010 and 2011 as well as being responsible for publishing our digital and printed magazines focusing on private equity and venture capital. Connect with...

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